Adventures With Google Glass – Part 1

Not too long ago I received a coveted notification from Google to inform me of my opportunity to join the “Glass Explorers” program.  It’s a cool opportunity, but by no means is it like rolling in with a rock star pass.  Nope, instead you get to buy the Google Glass, approx, $1,500.00, and then go to one of three locations to pick them up (you pay your own travel).  So I chose the greatest location, because of the city it was in, Chelsea Market in New York City. So the family and I drove up and stayed two evenings at the Jade Hotel in Greenwich Village and enjoyed a lot of what NYC has to offer.  But none of this is really important, what follows next is the crux of this whole post. Continue reading

Thank You Microsoft. Really, Thank You for modern.ie

As a front-end developer I have to always be sure that whatever feature I roll out works for my customers.  In the past I had to stand up multiple VMs of various Windows OSs and Internet Explorer versions.  The Windows XP with IE6 is a favorite of mine. But now, thanks to Microsoft, there is modern.ie
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My Ruby and Rails Journey – Part 1

DISCLAIMER –  I want to clarify the title that I will be using for this series of posts.  I know what Ruby on Rails is, but I am taking a different approach.  I am learning Ruby, the language, while also working with Rails, the framework.  So I am digging through the famous Pickaxe book to learn about the language of Ruby and I am also working through Rails3 in Action. This is the story of my journey.

Most of my “career” as a developer has been focused on the frontend (e.g. JavaScript, CSS, HTML, ActionScript and Flex).  But I have also been working with many different backend technologies (e.g. Coldfusion, PHP, Java, Groovy/Grails).  The reason I am always looking at backend technologies is to improve my efficiency in proving out frontend solutions.  After all, a UI with no backend is about as useful as a Powerpoint or Photoshop file, which makes it hard to drive technical change with decision makers.  Trust me, if you are a frontend developer or designer, and all you ever do is create pictures and never implement; no one will care about your technical opinion.  You will fail.  Time to get on with the post..

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